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Shakespeare: "...That strain again, it had a dying fall..."
An interesting technical question was asked at the Q&A session with Jorge and Maria last Saturday (15 January) and I had the impression that it is unclear what cadence means in relation to tango. I've long wondered about it myself and so was prompted to research it and share it with you. Here is what I discovered. In a Spanish dictionary (http://www.spanishdict.com), the Spanish word "cadencia" translates to cadence in English. This is where some ambiguity arise. I quote: --------- 1. Cadence, fall of the voice. (f) 2. Cadence, number, measure, flow of verses or periods. (f) 3. In dancing, the correspondence of the motion of the body with the music. (f) Hablar en cadencia -> to affect the harmonious flow of rhythm when speaking in prose --------- In Italian (and this is relevant because tango musicians mostly had Italian roots), the word "cadenza" also translates to "cadence" in English. I won't go into what cadence technically means to musicians (suffice to say that it refers to various forms to close musical phrases with generally two chords) but instead I shall describe the Italian word "cadenza". When you speak with a musician, cadenza as marked in orchestral scores refers to a fairly long passage of music during which a solo instrumentalist plays flourishes before ending with a cadence (which is intended to signal to the conductor and the rest of the orchestra the close of the soloist's exhibition of virtuosi). I've come across cadenzas during many concertos which I've had the pleasure of performing as a member of the orchestra's rank and file, but I've never heard of a cadenza in any of the tango music I've danced to, so let's disregard this meaning for tango. I've mentioned cadenza so that it is evident that one differentiates between what cadence means to a dancer and what it means to a musician. The meaning changes depending on which word you use - cadencia, cadenza, or cadence. So what does cadence mean to a tango dancer? On one previous visit to Buenos Aires, when I asked one of my Argentine partners to dance with cadencia with me, he put in more body motion, I experienced more rhythmical awareness and lilt - the lilt was on a horizontal level and there was definitely NO bobbing up or down. I felt more body motion and that was physically challenging because it was harder to follow - but it was a very musical and dynamic experience for me. I long for, as Shakespeare put it, "that strain again; it had a dying fall".



Re: Shakespeare: "...That strain again, it had a dying fall..."

Originally posted by June

On one previous visit to Buenos Aires, when I asked one of my Argentine partners to dance with cadencia with me, he put in more body motion, I experienced more rhythmical awareness and lilt - the lilt was on a horizontal level and there was definitely NO bobbing up or down. I felt more body motion and that was physically challenging because it was harder to follow - but it was a very musical and dynamic experience for me.

Hi June,

Here are some hints for the CADENCIA.

1)“Tango Our Dance” Buenos Aires 1987 Documentary on SBS 29/01/98
A local Milonguero comments something like this
“Cadencia in tango means to move like this・・・・both your body and you feel.
If you'd like to see this document let me know.
 
2) Oscar Casas’s Tango Lesson Class “Cadencia”  in Youtube.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9H34OaCBSQc&feature=related
A rocking movement ( referring to pendulum effect) that represents the melody. In Argentine tango this is called "cadencia".
 
3)“Osvaldo Sotto & Mora Goddy” Lesson Video
They demonstrate a particular figure called Cadencia.
 
Chau,
Yoshi




Re: Shakespeare: "...That strain again, it had a dying fall..."
Yoshi, many thanks for your comments. Sometimes it is very hard to find words that describe that feeling of body motion. Yes, I would very much like to see the document from SBS that you mentioned. See you on Wednesday?



Re: Shakespeare: "...That strain again, it had a dying fall..."

Hi June,

Unfortunately I'm not able to atend milongas this week.

So,see you next week.

Your experience with your partner in Buenos Aires regarding CADENCIA is more or less explainning the movement of CADENCIA.

If you watch  milongueando carefully in Buenos Aires whole floor is moving with CADENCIA just like a cluster of birds or fish.

Smooth and no crash.

Yoshi

 

 





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